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Battle Spirits Saga Comprehensive Rules
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Note: While these rules were copied verbatim from the official rules PDF, that document may have been updated recently which would make these rules out of date. This page is intended only as a quick reference.

Download the Official Rules PDF

1.
Game Overview
1-1.
Number of Players
1-1-1
Battle Spirits Saga is a competitive game between two players. At this time, these comprehensive rules do not address gameplay for alternative player counts.
1-2.
Winning and Losing the Game
1-2-1
A game of Battle Spirits Saga ends when one player wins and the other loses.
1-2-1-1
There are two victory conditions, which are listed below.
1-2-1-1-1
Your opponent’s life total is zero.
1-2-1-1-2
Your opponent has no cards in their deck at the start of their start step.
1-2-2
When either player fulfills a victory condition, the next time gameplay management is performed it will establish that player as the winner.
1-2-3
When both players fulfill a victory condition simultaneously, the game results in a draw.
1-2-4
Either player can concede the game at any time. The player who concedes loses the game and their opponent wins the game immediately without the need for further gameplay management.
1-2-5
Conceding is unaffected by any card effects. There are no card effects that force a player to concede. Loss of the game by conceding is never a substitution of any substitution effect.
1-2-6
There are some card effects that can result in a player winning or losing the game. The player managing that effect wins or loses without needing to wait for a checkpoint, and the game ends.
1-3.
Fundamental Game Rules
1-3-1
If the text written on a card contradicts the comprehensive rules, the text on the card takes precedence.
1-3-2
If a player is required to perform an action that is not possible for any reason, that action is not performed. However, if a player is required to a perform an action involving specific amounts and only part of the action is not possible, the player will perform as much of the action as possible.
1-3-2-1
If a player is required to establish a condition that already exists, that condition is not established again and the new act of establishing is treated as though it never took place.
1-3-2-2
If a player is required to move a game piece from one area to that same area, or from one card to that same card, that movement is not performed and is treated as though it never took place.
1-3-2-3
If for any reason a player is required to perform an action zero times or a negative number of times, that action is not performed. A negative does not cause the opposite of that action to be performed.
1-3-3
When a card’s effect requires an action that an active effect prevents, the active effect takes precedence and the action is prevented.
1-3-4
When both players are required for any reason to make a selection simultaneously, the player taking their turn chooses first. The other player chooses after that.
1-3-5
When choosing an amount as required by a card or rule, especially when the amount is not specified, the player must choose a whole number of zero or greater. Fractions, numbers including a fraction or decimal, and negative numbers are not allowed.
1-3-5-1
When a card or rule stipulates choosing “up to” some numerical upper limit and no lower limit is specified, the player may choose zero.
1-3-6
When a card’s effect causes card information to be altered, unless otherwise specified or defined in the rules, the result must be a whole number and not include a fraction. Numbers that would become a negative number are treated as zero except when making further adjustments to them.
1-3-7
Unless specified otherwise, the actions of a card’s effect are performed in the order written on the card.
2.
Card Information
2-1.
Card Name
2-1-1
The card name of a card is printed at the top of the card.
2-2.
Card Art
2-2-1
Card art is a visual depiction of the card’s content.
2-2-2
Card art holds no significance in regard to the rules.
2-3.
Card Types
2-3-1
The card type of a card is printed in the lower left corner of the card art.
2-3-2
There are three card types: spirit, nexus, and magic.
2-4.
Color
2-4-1
The color of a card is shown by a color indicator located on the card frame at the bottom of the card near the right side.
2-4-1-1
There are six card colors: red, purple, white, yellow, green, and blue.
2-4-1-2
Some cards have multiple colors, such as red and blue, or green and yellow.
2-5.
Spirit Type
2-5-1
The spirit type of a card is printed below the card name near the right side of the card.
2-5-2
Spirit type indicates a group to which the card belongs.
2-5-3
A card may have multiple spirit types.
2-6.
Cost
2-6-1
The cost of a card is printed in the upper left corner of the card.
2-6-2
This number is the base cost a player must pay when summoning, placing, or using a card from their hand.
2-7.
Reduction Symbols
2-7-1
The reduction symbols of a card are printed to the right of the cost.
2-7-2
A reduction symbol is a colored icon indicating an applicable symbol color.
2-7-3
When summoning, placing, or paying the use cost of a card, reduce the cost of the card by one for each symbol on your field matching one of the card’s reduction symbols, limited by the amount of reduction symbols printed on the card.
2-8.
Symbols
2-8-1
Symbols are printed in the lower right corner of the card.
2-8-2
Each symbol has a color.
2-8-3
Some cards have multiple symbols, while other cards have no symbols at all.
2-9.
Card Text
2-9-1
The effects of a card are listed on the lower half of the card and include text defining each effect.
2-9-2
Card text may include text that holds no significance in regard to the rules.
2-9-2-1
Annotations written in parentheses help explain or supplement the rules used by cards.
2-9-2-2
Flavor text is written in italics and typically located below any effect text. Flavor text holds no significance in regard to the rules.
2-9-3
Cards without any card text (other than card text that holds no significance in regard to the rules) function as cards without any effects listed.
2-10.
Levels
2-10-1
The levels of a card are listed to the left of the card text.
2-10-2
Cards on the field possess effects and BP in accordance with their current level.
2-10-3
Levels have maintenance costs. When the number of cores placed on a card exceeds the number needed to fulfill the maintenance costs of one or more levels, treat the card as the highest level among the levels for which the maintenance cost has been met.
2-10-3-1
The maintenance cost for a level is printed below and to the right of that level.
2-10-4
Cards may have BP designated for their levels, which are referred to as LV1 BP, LV2 BP, etc.
2-11.
BP
2-11-1
BP is printed underneath each level.
2-11-2
BP indicates the strength of a spirit during battle.
2-12.
Block
2-12-1
The block icon of a card is located on the card frame at the bottom of the card and indicates the block to which the card belongs.
2-12-2
The number of the card’s block is printed inside the block icon.
2-12-3
A card’s block holds no significance in regard to gameplay.
2-13.
Card Frame Information
2-13-1
Information printed on the card frame along the bottom and lower right sides of the card has no effect on gameplay.
2-13-1-1
Most cards have a card number printed in the lower right corner. This card number displays what card set (booster pack, prebuilt deck, etc.) the card belongs to, as well as the card’s individual number within that set.
2-13-1-2
Card rarity is printed to the left of the card number.
2-13-1-3
Card copyright information is printed in the lower left corner of the card.
2-13-1-4
The name of the card’s illustrator and/or concept designer is printed along the right side of the card near the lower right corner.
3.
Gameplay Areas
3-1.
Areas
3-1-1
There are eight locations, or areas, where game pieces are placed or held during gameplay: the deck area, the hand, the trash, the field, the reserve, the life area, the burst area, and the void. Unless specified otherwise, each player possesses their own separate area for each area type.
3-1-2
The number of cards in any area is public information and can be confirmed by either player at any time during the game.
3-1-3
Cards in some areas are free to be viewed by all players, while cards in other areas are not. Areas where cards are free to be viewed are referred to as public, while areas where cards are not free to be viewed are referred to as private.
3-1-4
Unless specified otherwise, when moving a card from one area to another, treat it as a new card. Any effects that were applied to it in the previous area are ignored.
3-1-5
Unless specified otherwise, when multiple cards are placed in a new region simultaneously, the order in which they are placed is decided by their owner.
3-1-6
Unless specified otherwise, cards are moved into areas belonging to their owners when the owner of the new area is not specified.
3-2.
Deck Area
3-2-1
The deck area is where you place your deck at start of the game. Each player has one deck area.
3-2-2
The deck area is private. Cards within it are placed facedown in a single stack. Neither player is allowed to view the contents or order of the cards, nor are they allowed to change the order of the cards.
3-2-3
When moving multiple cards from the deck area simultaneously, do so one card at a time.
3-2-3-1
When moving multiple cards to the deck area simultaneously, do so one card at a time. When multiple cards are moved to the deck from a public area, the order in which the cards are moved is also public.
3-2-4
When a deck is required to be shuffled, reorder the cards randomly. The deck owner always shuffles the deck first, regardless of whose effect initiated the shuffle. Then their opponent either shuffles and/or cuts the deck.
3-3.
The Hand
3-3-1
The hand is where players place cards drawn from their deck.
3-3-2
The hand area is private, but the owner may freely view or reorder the cards in their own hand.
3-3-3
You may not view the contents of the cards in the other player’s hand.
3-3-4
There is no limit to the number of cards allowed in a hand.
3-4.
The Trash
3-4-1
Each player's trash area is divided into a section for placing discarded cards and a section for placing cores. Destroyed cards, cards discarded from the deck or the hand, magic cards which have had their effects resolved, and other similar cards go into the card section of the trash area. Cores used to pay costs or placed into the trash by effects go into the core section of the trash area.
3-4-2
The trash area is public. Cards within it are placed faceup in a single stack, and both players are free to view them and change their order.
3-4-3
There is no limit to the number of cards or cores that can be placed into the trash.
3-5.
The Field
3-5-1
The field is where players place their spirits and nexuses.
3-5-2
The field area is public. Cards on the field are placed faceup.
3-5-3
Unless specified otherwise, place cards on the field in a refreshed state.
3-5-4
There are no restrictions on how many cards may be summoned or placed on the field.
3-5-5
Unless specified otherwise, when cards on the field move to other areas, cores on those cards are placed into the reserve of the card’s controller.
3-6.
The Reserve
3-6-1
The reserve area is where players place cores that have entered gameplay but are not currently in use.
3-6-2
The reserve area is public. Both players are free to view cores placed into the reserve.
3-6-3
There is no limit to the number of cores that can be placed into the reserve.
3-7.
The Life Area
3-7-1
The life area, or life, is where players place their life cores.
3-7-2
The life area is public. Both players are free to view life cores placed into the life area.
3-7-3
There is no limit to the number of cores that can placed into the life.
3-8.
The Burst Area
3-8-1
Cards with burst effects may be set facedown in the burst area.
3-8-2
Cards in the burst area are private. Only the owner of a card set in the burst area may freely view it.
3-8-3
No more than one card may be set in the burst area at any time. If a card is currently set in the burst area and a second card is set, the first card is discarded.
3-8-4
Only cards with burst effects can be set in the burst area.
3-8-5
After a game ends, all cards set in burst areas are turned faceup to confirm they possess burst effects.
3-9.
The Void
3-9-1
The void is public. Store cores in the void until they are needed during gameplay. Players may establish separate voids of their own or share a common one.
3-9-2
There is no limit to the number of cores that can be in the void. If the void runs out of cores, add more, or use other objects such as coins, chips, or cards.
4.
Essential Game Terminology
4-1.
Effects and Effect Directives
4-1-1
Effects are characteristics of cards which can influence gameplay. Some cards will possess effects which are listed in their text. Effects can also be conferred to cards by the rules or other effects.
4-1-2
The portions of an effect which dictate how that effect is performed are called effect directives.
4-1-2-1
Effect directives can be one of two types: immediately resolving or continuous.
4-2.
The Owner
4-2-1
The card owner refers to the player who constructed the deck that card is in.
4-2-2
A card’s owner is the player who started play with that card in their deck.
4-2-3
At the end of a game, all cards are returned to the players who own them.
4-2-4
If a card effect requires that a card be moved to an area other than its owner's field, that card moves to the area belonging to the owner, and not the area belonging to their opponent.
4-3.
The Player
4-3-1
Players are those individuals who are taking part in the game. They can also be referred to as the player who is currently taking their turn and the player who is not.
4-3-2
The opposing player in a two-player game is also referred to as the opponent.
4-4.
Card Orientation
4-4-1
Cards placed on the field have one of the two orientations described below.
4-4-1-1
Refreshed: the card is placed vertically in front of you with its top facing toward your opponent.
4-4-1-2
Exhausted: the card is placed horizontally in front of you.
4-5.
Drawing Cards
4-5-1
Drawing a card is one method of moving a card from your deck to your hand.
4-5-2
When a player is instructed to draw a card, they move one card from the top of their deck into their hand without revealing it to the other player.
4-5-3
If a player is instructed to draw N cards and N is zero, nothing happens. When N is greater than zero, that player repeats the action of drawing one card N number of times.
4-6.
Effects With X (Variable Numbers)
4-6-1
Some effects make use of the letter “X” in their cost or text to represent variable numbers.
4-6-2
When determining the value of a variable number X for a card or an effect, and that number is not defined by the card or effect itself, the controlling player determines the value.
4-6-3
Once determined, the same numerical value is assigned to all instances of X within a single effect, starting with the payment of its cost and ending with the resolution of its final effect directive.
4-7.
Checkpoints
4-7-1
Checkpoints refer to points in time during gameplay where gameplay management is performed.
4-7-2
The moment any condition requiring gameplay management is fulfilled, a checkpoint occurs. All checkpoints for gameplay management which occur simultaneously are performed simultaneously. If the result of performing gameplay management at a checkpoint fulfills conditions requiring further gameplay management, another checkpoint occurs.
4-8.
Game Pieces
4-8-1
Cores and cards used in the game are referred to as game pieces.
4-9.
Spirits
4-9-1
Spirit cards summoned onto the field are referred to as spirits.
4-9-2
Spirits possess all the information printed on their cards.
4-10.
Nexuses
4-10-1
Nexus cards placed on the field are referred to as a nexus singular or nexuses plural.
4-10-2
Nexuses possess all of the information printed on their cards.
4-11.
Cores
4-11-1
There are two types of cores: regular cores and soul cores.
4-11-2
Players may use either standard cores or core cards as their core game pieces.
4-11-3
Each player possesses only one soul core. Soul cores are affected by effects which target cores, with the exception that they cannot be placed into the void by an effect unless that effect specifically targets soul cores.
4-11-4
Soul cores placed into the void by effects can only be affected by effects which target soul cores.
5.
Preparing to Play
5-1.
Preparing a Deck
5-1-1
Before the game, each player prepares a deck consisting of their own cards.
5-1-1-1
A deck consists of at least fifty and no more than sixty Battle Spirits Saga cards. Each deck is limited to four or fewer copies of cards with the same name.
5-2.
Before the Game
5-2-1
Establish a location for the void, where cores are stored. Players can share one void or create their own. There is no limit to the number of cores allowed in the void. If the void runs out of cores, add more, or use other objects such as core cards, coins, or chips.
5-2-2
Each player randomly shuffles their own deck. Then each player either shuffles their opponent's deck and/or cuts it. Shuffled decks are placed with their cards facedown in the deck area.
5-2-3
Each player places five cores from the void into their life.
5-2-4
Each player places one soul core and three cores from the void into their reserve.
5-2-5
Each player draws four cards from their deck to create their hand.
5-2-6
Use a random method such as rock paper scissors to determine player one and player two. The winner decides who becomes player one. Player one will take their turn first.
5-2-7
Starting with player one, each player decides if they will mulligan. Players may only mulligan once. Players who choose to mulligan must first return their hand to the bottom of their deck in any order, draw four cards, then randomly shuffle their deck. Lastly, their opponent either further shuffles the deck and/or cuts it. Players who choose not to mulligan draw one additional card.
5-2-8
Player one begins taking their first turn.
6.
Game Progression
6-1.
Turn Flow
6-1-1
The game progresses as both players alternate taking turns one at a time. Each turn is composed of seven steps: the start step, the core step, the draw step, the refresh step, the main step, the attack step, and the end step. The player taking their turn performs all seven steps in order, at which point they have completed a full turn.
6-1-2
Some steps allow the player taking their turn to initiate certain actions freely, while other steps are devoted to gameplay management which must be performed each turn before transitioning to the next step.
6-2.
Start Step
6-2-1
Effects worded to trigger "at the start of the step" activate now.
6-2-2
Check if the player taking their turn has no cards in their deck. If so, establish a winner. This is part of gameplay management. Once completed, resolve any effects waiting for resolution and advance to the next step.
6-3.
Core Step
6-3-1
Effects worded to trigger "at the start of the step" activate now.
6-3-2
The player taking their turn places one core from the void into their reserve. This is part of gameplay management. Afterwards, if there are any effects waiting for resolution, resolve them. Otherwise, advance to the next step.
6-3-3
There is no core step for player one on their first turn.
6-4.
Draw Step
6-4-1
Effects worded to trigger "at the start of the step" activate now.
6-4-2
The player taking their turn draws one card from their deck. This is part of gameplay management. Afterwards, if there are any effects waiting for resolution, resolve them. Otherwise, advance to the next step.
6-5.
Refresh Step
6-5-1
Effects worded to trigger "at the start of the step" activate now.
6-5-2
The player taking their turn refreshes all of the cards on their field and moves all of the cores from their trash into their reserve. This is part of gameplay management. Afterwards, if there are any effects waiting for resolution, resolve them. Otherwise, advance to the next step.
6-6.
Main Step
6-6-1
The player taking their turn can perform various actions during this step, which progresses in the following order.
6-6-1-1
Effects worded to trigger "at the start of the step" activate now.
6-6-1-2
The player taking their turn is now given the opportunity to select from the following list of actions permitted during the main step and perform any of them.
6-6-1-2-1
When all other management has been resolved, the player taking their turn may summon spirits, place nexuses, use magic, set burst cards, move cores, activate main step effects, or end the main step. (These actions are described later in the rules.)
6-6-1-2-2
Placing a card with a burst effect from your hand facedown in the burst area is called setting a burst card. Only one burst card may be set per turn.
6-6-1-2-3
When players move cores, they are free to move any cores on their field or in their reserve. This includes placing cores from their reserve onto cards on their field, placing cores on cards on their field into their reserve, and moving cores from one card on their field onto another card on their field. Cores on their field or in their reserve may also be swapped with soul cores on their field or in their reserve.
6-6-1-2-4
When the player taking their turn finishes an action and no management remains unresolved, they may perform another action.
6-6-1-2-5
When no management remains unresolved and the player taking their turn is able to perform another action, they may declare an end to their main step and advance to the next step.
6-7.
Attack Step
6-7-1
During the attack step the player taking their turn may use spirits they control on their field to attack their opponent. If they attack, a battle begins. (Spirit battles are described later in the rules.)
6-7-2
There is no attack step for player one on their first turn.
6-7-3
The attack step progresses in the following order.
6-7-3-1
Effects worded "at the start of the step" activate now.
6-7-3-2
The player taking their turn is given an opportunity to act. If no management remains unresolved, they may attack with their spirits, or declare an end to their attack step and advance to the next step. If they attack, a battle begins.
6-8.
End Step
6-8-1
The end step is for various actions that are performed before the turn ends, and it progresses in the following order.
6-8-1-1
Effects worded "end of your turn" or “end of opponent’s turn” activate now.
6-8-1-2
After all management required at this time has been performed, effects which are only active "during this turn" or "until the end of the turn" become inactive. Continue resolving any additional events requiring management which occur as a result.
6-8-1-3
The turn ends, and the next turn begins at its start step with the opponent becoming the player taking their turn.
7.
Attacking and Battles
7-1.
During the attack step, the player taking their turn may use one of their spirits to attack their opponent. If they do, the players enter a battle. The battle is managed in the following order, until it ends, starting with the attack declaration.
7-1-1
Attack Declaration
7-1-1-1
The player taking their turn can attack with one refreshed spirit on their field which they control. First, they exhaust the spirit they wish to attack with and declare their attack.
7-1-1-2
Effects worded "when attacking" or "when this spirit attacks" activate now. Effects worded “while attacking,” “during the battle,” or “during battle” are now active if their conditions are fulfilled.
7-1-2
Flash Window Prior to Blocking
7-1-2-1
Flash effects can be used during this flash window. First, the player being attacked is given the option to use one flash effect. They may also pass, without using one. Regardless of whether the first player uses a flash effect or passes, the second player is then given the option to use a flash effect. End the flash window when two passes are declared in a row.
7-1-3
Block Declaration
7-1-3-1
The player being attacked can block with one refreshed spirit on their field that they control. First, they exhaust the spirit they wish to block with and declare their block. If no block is declared, the battle advances to battle resolution and the flash window following blocking is not performed.
7-1-3-2
Effects worded "when blocking" or "when this spirit blocks" activate now. Effects worded “while blocking” are now active if their conditions are fulfilled.
7-1-4
Flash Window Following Blocking
7-1-4-1
Flash effects can be used during this flash window. First, the player blocking is given the option to use one flash effect. They may also pass, without using one. Regardless of whether the first player uses a flash effect or passes, the second player is then given the option to use a flash effect. End the flash window when two passes are declared in a row.
7-1-5
Battle Resolution
7-1-5-1
The result of a spirit's attack is determined during battle resolution. If the spirit was blocked, advance to comparing BP. If the spirit was not blocked, advance to applying damage.
7-1-5-2
Comparing BP
7-1-5-2-1
The result of a battle between two spirits is determined by comparing BP. If either the attacking or the blocking spirit has already been removed from the field by this time, do nothing. The BP of the two battling spirits are compared, and the spirit with fewer BP is destroyed. If their BP are equal, both spirits are destroyed. Then advance to the end of the battle (7-1-6).
7-1-5-3
Applying Damage
7-1-5-3-1
When applying damage, the player being attacked has their life reduced as a result of the spirit's attack. If the attacking spirit has already been removed from the field by this time, do nothing. Determine the number of symbols on the attacking spirit and move an equal number of cores from the blocking player's life into their reserve. Then advance to the end of the battle (7-1-6).
7-1-6
End of the Battle
7-1-6-1
Effects worded "when the battle ends" activate now.
7-1-6-2
Effects worded "while attacking," “while this spirit attacks,” "while blocking," “while this spirit attacks,” "during the battle," or “during battle” which were active while the battle took place become inactive.
7-1-6-3
The player taking their turn is now given the opportunity to perform their next action.
8.
Effect Activation and Resolution
8-1.
Effects
8-1-1
Effects are one of the key components of a card that give it the ability to influence the game. The effects a card has are described within that card’s effect text.
8-1-2
Effects can generally be divided into four types: activated, constant, triggered, or magic.
8-1-3
Activated effects may be used during the main step by the player taking their turn, or during flash windows by any player able to use a flash effect. They activate when their cost is paid and their conditions are met.
8-1-3-1
Activated effects are labeled either main, flash, or both main and flash. Effects labeled main can be activated during the main step of your turn. Effects labeled flash can be used during flash windows.
8-1-4
Constant effects continuously apply one or more effect directives while they are active.
8-1-4-1
Some constant effects require that certain conditions be fulfilled in order to become active.
8-1-4-2
When their conditions are fulfilled, constant effects automatically become activeand begin continuously applying their effect directives.
8-1-5
Triggered effects activate when an event specified by the effect occurs in the game.
8-1-5-1
Triggered effects have either a timing event printed in bold lettering next to their level or a conditional event described in their text.
8-1-6
Magic effects can be activated using magic cards.
8-1-6-1
Magic effects are labeled either main, flash, or both main and flash. Effects labeled main can be used during the main step of your turn. Effects labeled flash can be used during flash windows.
8-1-7
Both of the terms “activate” and “trigger” used in card text have the same meaning in regard to gameplay. An active effect that prevents an effect from “triggering” also prevents any effect from “activating” and vice versa.
8-1-8
An effect directive in card text that is worded using a potential form such as “may” indicates that the related action is optional, and the player may choose not to perform said action.
8-2.
Effect Directives
8-2-1
Effect directives are the directions within effects which describe their management.
8-2-2
Effect directives can be one of two types: immediately resolving or continuous.
8-2-2-1
With immediately resolving effect directives, the effect ends after the directive is performed. Examples include "draw one card," "destroy all spirits," and "place one core on all of your spirits."
8-2-2-2
With continuous effect directives, the effect is active over some period of time. Examples include "all of your spirits gain 1000 BP during this turn," and "all of your opponent's spirits are treated as LV1 during this turn."
8-2-2-2-1
The period of activity specified applies to all of the effect directives within the accompanying text.
8-2-2-2-2
One kind of continuous effect directive is substitution effects. These effects substitute gameplay management or effect directives with some other management, add additional management, or cause other similar substitutions.
8-3.
Active and Inactive Effects
8-3-1
Certain effects become active or inactive in response to other effects. Follow the steps below when managing these situations.
8-3-2
If part or all of an effect is described as being inactive under a certain condition, those inactive portions persist but are not applied while the condition exists. If the impacted effect would normally require a selection to be made, that selection is ignored.
8-3-3
If part or all of an effect is described as being active under a certain condition, those affected portions become inactive so long as that condition remains unfulfilled.
8-4.
Effect Costs
8-4-1
In effect directives which state “you may...to...” or similar phrasing, the directives which allows you to perform the effect are called effect costs.
8-4-2
To pay an effect cost means to resolve the directives described in that effect cost.
8-4-2-1
If an effect cost contains more than one directive, resolve them in order starting with the first directive in the text.
8-4-2-2
If additional effect costs are added by other effects, resolve them next.
8-4-2-3
The effect cost of an effect can only be paid if every portion of it is able to be paid.
8-4-2-4
If you cannot pay the effect cost, that effect does not activate.
8-5.
Activation and Resolution
8-5-1
Activated, triggered, and magic effects all apply their effect directives and resolve after activation. Constant effects continuously apply their effect directives without activation.
8-5-2
Follow the sequence described below when activating an effect.
8-5-2-1
Specify which effect you are activating. If the effect belongs to a card in your hand, reveal the card. If it is a burst effect, turn over your burst card to reveal it.
8-5-2-2
If activation requires a cost, determine what that cost is and pay it in full.
8-5-2-3
The effect now activates and enters a state where it is waiting to be resolved.
8-5-2-4
Resolve the effect. If multiple effects have activated and are waiting to be resolved, begin resolution with the most recently activated effect. When multiple effects activate simultaneously, the player taking their turn chooses one effect to resolve first.
8-5-3
When an effect's description includes the selection of cards, or players, or such (hereafter referred to as the target), make the selection when directed to do so during resolution.
8-5-3-1
If the number of targets is specified, you must select enough targets to fulfill that number. In the event there are not enough targets to fulfill this number, you must select all available targets, without being allowed to omit any eligible targets from selection.
8-5-3-2
If the description says to select "up to" a certain count, you are free to select any number of targets from zero up to and including that count. If the description says to select “any number,” you are free to select any number of targets including zero.
8-5-3-3
When the number of targets is specified but only a portion of that number is able to be selected, finish resolving the effect with as many targets as you are able to select.
8-5-3-4
When the number of targets is specified but none are able to be selected, that target cannot be chosen, and all effects associated with that target are ignored.
8-5-3-5
When you are required to select unrevealed cards from a private area with the condition that selected cards have specific information on them, there is no guarantee any cards in the area will have that information. Therefore, the player selecting is free to ignore any cards in that area which fulfill the condition. Unless specified otherwise, cards selected from private areas must be revealed in order to demonstrate they fulfill the conditions for selection.
8-5-4
When the text of an effect specifies a spirit or a nexus with no further description, that spirit or nexus is assumed to be on the field.
8-5-5
When the text of an effect specifies a core or a soul core with no further description, that core or soul core is assumed to be in the life, the field, the reserve, or the trash.
8-5-6
When instructed to move a core from one area to another and its type is not specified in those instructions, that core’s controller chooses whether to move a core or a soul core.
8-6.
Resolving Potentially Triggered Effects
8-6-1
Potentially triggered effects activate when an event specified in the effect occurs during the game.
8-6-2
When conditions for activating a triggered effect are fulfilled, it activates one time and waits to be resolved.
8-6-3
If conditions for activating a triggered effect are fulfilled multiple times simultaneously, it only activates one time and waits to be resolved. For example, when two or more of your spirits are destroyed simultaneously, a triggered effect worded "when one of your spirits is destroyed" will only activate one time.
8-7.
Effect Directives Which Immediately Resolve
8-7-1
When required to perform an effect directive which immediately resolves, perform the described action one time only.
8-8.
Effect Directives Which Are Continuous
8-8-1
When one or more continuous effect directives are active and they require information from a card, apply those directives in the order described below. Even though they are applied sequentially, treat them as though they are applied simultaneously all at once.
8-8-1-1
Begin with all of the information as it is written on the card itself.
8-8-1-2
Apply all of the continuous effect directives which do not alter numerical values within that information.
8-8-1-3
Apply all of the continuous effect directives which do alter numerical values within that information.
8-8-1-3-1
Effect directives which alter a spirit's BP, either directly or as a result of altering its level, are applied in the order described below. Multiple effects falling within the same category are applied chronologically.
8-8-1-3-2
Effects altering BP①: Apply effect directives which alter the spirit's level.
8-8-1-3-3
Effects altering BP②: Apply effects which redefine the BP written on the card. This includes effects which alter the level BP.
8-8-1-3-4
Effects altering BP③: Apply effects which assign a specific value to the BP.
8-8-1-3-5
Effects altering BP④: Apply effects which increase or decrease the BP. This includes effects which add or subtract some amount.
8-8-1-4
Continuous effect directives not belonging to constant effects determine which game pieces they apply to when their effect is resolved.
8-8-1-5
Continuous effect directives which alter information on cards in specific areas are applied to that information the moment an applicable card enters that area.
8-8-1-5-1
Triggered effects which activate when cards with specific information on them enter an area observe that information after any continuous effect directives applicable to that area are applied.
8-9.
Resolving Substitution Effects
8-9-1
When a substitution effect is active and the event it applies to would occur, substitute the replacement event provided by the effect without performing the original event.
8-9-1-1
In this case, the original event ends up never occurring.
8-9-2
When an event occurs and multiple applicable substitution effects are active, the affected player decides which substitution effect to apply.
8-9-2-1
If the event is a card or an effect, the player controlling that card or effect decides.
8-9-2-2
If the event is a particular action during the game, the player performing that action decides.
8-9-3
Only one substitution effect may be applied to any one event.
8-10.
The Last State of a Card
8-10-1
If an effect directive is observing a particular card’s state or information and that card moves to another area before the effect directive finishes, continue performing the effect directive as though it is observing the card's last state prior to being moved, including information and orientation.
9.
Gameplay Management
9-1.
Gameplay Management Basics
9-1-1
Gameplay management is a general term for any management which is required to be performed by the rules during or following certain events in the game.
9-1-2
Gameplay management can be divided into two types: interrupting and checkpoint.
9-1-2-1
Interrupting gameplay management is resolved immediately when it occurs, even if that requires interrupting another action.
9-1-2-2
Checkpoint gameplay management is only performed at specific checkpoints during the game, and only after confirming that certain conditions are fulfilled. If the checkpoint is reached and those conditions are not fulfilled, this gameplay management is not performed, even if the conditions had been fulfilled during the performance of some other action.
9-1-2-3
If during gameplay management multiple checkpoints need managing simultaneously, that management is performed simultaneously.
9-2.
Establishing a Winner
9-2-1
Establishing a winner is an interrupting gameplay management rule.
9-2-2
If any player fulfills one of the following victory conditions when gameplay management begins, all players fulfilling one of the conditions win the game.
9-2-3
Your opponent has zero life.
9-2-4
Your opponent has no cards in their deck at the start of their start step.
9-3.
When a Spirit or Nexus Has Insufficient Cores for LV1
9-3-1
Managing when a spirit or nexus has insufficient cores for LV1 is a checkpoint gameplay management rule.
9-3-2
If the number of cores on a spirit or nexus becomes insufficient for LV1, that card is destroyed. When a spirit or nexus owner’s actions or cost payments result in a change in the number of cores on the card or a change in the LV1 cost of the card, and consequently the number of cores on the spirit or nexus becomes insufficient for LV1, that spirit or nexus is considered to be self-destroyed. Effects which trigger when a card is destroyed and effects which substitute some other management for destruction do not activate under these circumstances.
9-3-2-1
When the number of cores on a spirit or nexus has been altered by an effect and that spirit or nexus is destroyed as a result of the number of cores on it becoming insufficient for LV1, treat the card as if it were destroyed by the effect.
9-3-2-2
When the LV1 cost of a spirit or nexus has been altered by an effect and that spirit or nexus is destroyed as a result of the number of cores on it becoming insufficient for LV1, treat the card as if it were destroyed by the effect.
9-4.
When the BP of a Spirit Becomes Zero or Less
9-4-1
Managing when the BP of a spirit becomes zero or less is a checkpoint gameplay management rule.
9-4-2
If the BP of a spirit becomes zero or less, that card is destroyed.
9-4-2-1
When the BP of a spirit has been altered by an effect and that spirit is destroyed as a result of its BP becoming zero or less, treat the card as if it were destroyed by the effect.
9-4-2-2
When the level of a spirit has been altered by an effect and that spirit is destroyed as a result of its BP becoming zero or less, treat that card as if it were destroyed by the effect.
9-4-2-3
When a spirit owner’s actions or cost payments result in a change of level or BP of the spirit, and consequently the spirit is destroyed as a result of its BP becoming zero or less, that spirit is considered self-destroyed.
10.
Effect Rules in Detail
10-1.
Destruction
10-1-1
To destroy a card means to place a card from the field into the trash.
10-1-2
Destruction happens when either a rule or an effect states that a card be destroyed. Cards placed into the trash for any other reason are not destroyed.
10-1-3
When Cards Are Destroyed
10-1-3-1
Sometimes spirits and nexuses are placed into the trash from the field by rules or effects. This is called destruction. The destruction of a card is performed in the following order.
10-1-3-2
Check if any effects substitute some other management for destruction and decide whether or not to apply them. If some other management is substituted, destruction management ends and the destruction does not occur.
10-1-3-3
Destruction has been confirmed. Effects triggered by destruction are now activated and waiting to be resolved.
10-1-3-4
The destroyed card is placed into its owner's trash, and any cores that were on the card are placed into its owner's reserve. These actions are considered to happen simultaneously.
10-2.
Discarding
10-2-1
To discard a card means to place a card into its owner's trash from either their hand, their deck, or their burst area.
10-2-2
When it is not specified where a card is to be discarded from, the card is discarded from the hand of the player who has been instructed to discard.
10-3.
Refresh a Card
10-3-1
To refresh a card means to change the state of a card on the field from exhausted to refreshed.
10-4.
Exhaust a Card
10-4-1
To exhaust a card means to change the state of a card on the field from refreshed to exhausted.
10-5.
Keep a Card on the Field
10-5-1
This describes when the destruction of a card is interrupted and it remains on the field. Since that card is not destroyed, it is not counted among destroyed cards, and no effects that would trigger on its destruction activate.
10-6.
Summoning a Card
10-6-1
To summon a spirit card means to place it on the field from some other area, turning it into a spirit.
10-6-2
Follow the steps below when summoning a spirit card.
10-6-3
Reveal the card that is being summoned.
10-6-4
Determine the cost of the card that is being summoned.
10-6-5
Determine cost reduction. Reduce the cost of the card by one for each symbol on your field matching one of the card's reduction symbols, limited by the amount of reduction symbols printed on the card. The resulting number becomes the summoning cost.
10-6-6
The player summoning the card moves a number of cores equal to the summoning cost from their field, their reserve, or both into their trash. This is called paying the summoning cost.
10-6-7
The card is placed on the field, and the player summoning the card places enough cores onto it to fulfill the cost of its lowest level, or more if they wish. These cores can come from their field, their reserve, or both.
10-7.
Placing a Card
10-7-1
To place a nexus card means to place it on the field from some other area, turning it into a nexus.
10-7-2
Follow the steps below when placing a nexus card.
10-7-3
Reveal the card that is being placed.
10-7-4
Determine the cost of the card that is being placed.
10-7-5
Determine cost reduction. Reduce the cost of the card by one for each symbol on your field matching one of the card's reduction symbols, limited by the amount of reduction symbols printed on the card. The resulting number becomes the placement cost.
10-7-6
The player placing the card moves a number of cores equal to the placing cost from their field, their reserve, or both into their trash. This is called paying the placing cost.
10-7-7
The card is placed on the field, and the player placing the card places enough cores onto it to fulfill the cost of its lowest level, or more if they wish. These cores can come from their field, their reserve or both.
10-8.
Using Magic Cards
10-8-1
To use a magic card means to activate any effect it possesses other than burst effects.
10-8-2
Follow the steps below when using a magic card.
10-8-3
Reveal the card that is being used. If it possesses more than one usable effect, select one.
10-8-4
Determine the cost of the card that is being used.
10-8-5
Determine cost reduction. Reduce the cost of the card by one for each symbol on your field matching one of the card's reduction symbols, limited by the amount of reduction symbols printed on the card. The resulting number becomes the use cost.
10-8-6
The player using the card moves a number of cores equal to the use cost from their field, their reserve, or both into their trash. This is called paying the use cost.
10-8-7
The card being used is now waiting to have its effect resolved. Cards waiting to have their effects resolved remain in the area where they started, however, they are not counted among other cards in that area, and they cannot be observed by other effects.
10-8-8
Resolve the magic effect. Following effect resolution, the magic card is placed into the trash.
10-9.
Bursts
10-9-1
Cards set facedown in the burst area are called bursts. Bursts are triggered effects which activate when their conditions are fulfilled.
10-9-2
When a burst is turned faceup and activated after its conditions have been fulfilled, that is called activating a burst. You do not need to pay the card cost to activate a burst.
10-9-3
A set burst may be activated at will when its triggering conditions have been fulfilled.
10-9-4
A burst that has resolved its effect is placed in the trash.
10-10.
Attacking Other Spirits
10-10-1
When a spirit is instructed to attack another spirit, the spirit being attacked immediately blocks the attacking spirit. Effects worded to activate “When This Spirit Blocks,” “when a spirit blocks,” and other similar phrasing activate the same as they would during block declaration. Afterward, advance to the flash window after blocking, as usual.
10-11.
“When This Spirit Attacks” and “When This Spirit Blocks”
10-11-1
When text is worded “when attacking” or “when this spirit attacks,” activate it after declaring an attack. When text is worded “when blocking” or “when this spirit blocks,” activate it after declaring a block.
10-11-2
When card text that is worded “when this spirit attacks or blocks” compares against “when this spirit attacks” or “when this spirit blocks,” either will fulfill the criterion.
10-12.
“While Attacking” and “While Blocking”
10-12-1
“While attacking” text becomes active after declaring an attack. “While blocking” text becomes active after declaring a block.
10-13.
“With【Keyword Effect】”
10-13-1
When comparing a card against the criterion “with 【Keyword Effect】,” a card on the field with an effect where the level condition has not been met will not fulfill the criterion. For example, an effect that states “spirits with 【Luster】 gain 1000 BP” would not apply to a LV1 spirit whose 【Luster】 effect was active starting at LV2.
10-13-2
When comparing a card in any area besides the field against the criterion “with 【Keyword Effect】,” a card that has the matching keyword, designated to be active at any level, will fulfill the criterion. However, a card that gains the keyword conditionally (worded such as “gain 【Keyword Effect】when...”) will only fulfill the criterion when the effect that grants the keyword effect is active.
10-14.
Destruction Effects
10-14-1
Effects worded “destroy” in the card text are called destruction effects.
10-14-2
Effects that move cores or reduce BP may indirectly cause cards to be destroyed, but these effects are not considered destruction effects.
10-15.
“When Destroyed” Effects
10-15-1
“When Destroyed” effects are effects that activate when a card is destroyed. These include effects with activations timings that are listed before the main effect text like“when destroyed” and “when destroyed by opponent,” bursts with conditions such as “burst: when opponent destroys your spirit,” and effect text phrased like “draw a card when one of your spirits is destroyed.”
11.
Keyword Effects
11-1.
【Awaken】
11-1-1
【Awaken】 is an activated effect. It can be activated any time a spirit on the field possessing it is able to use flash effects. When activated, the activating player moves one core (or more if they wish) from other cards on their field onto the card with 【Awaken】. If a card is destroyed as a result moving cores for this effect, that card does not activate effects which trigger when a card is destroyed.
11-2.
【Confront】
11-2-1
【Confront】is a constant effect. When a spirit possessing 【Confront】 attacks and the defending player controls any spirits which are able to block, that player must declare a block during block declaration.
11-2-2
When a player must block due to a 【Confront】 effect, they must choose which spirit to block with during block declaration. However, this does not count as making a selection with an effect. Spirits such as those with 【Armor】 that cannot be selected by an opponent’s effect can be chosen.
11-3.
【Curse】
11-3-1
【Curse】 is a triggered effect. When a spirit possessing 【Curse】 attacks and that spirit is blocked during battle resolution, the blocking spirit is destroyed at the end of the battle.
11-4.
【Immortal】
11-4-1
【Immortal】is a triggered effect which allows the spirit possessing it to be summoned from the trash when activated. 【Immortal】 is triggered when the spirit possessing it is in the trash and another spirit the player controls is destroyed, and that destroyed spirit fulfills the trigger conditions.
11-4-2
【Immortal】 appears on cards as 【Immortal: conditions】.
11-5.
【Armor】
11-5-1
【Armor】 is a constant effect. Spirits possessing 【Armor】 cannot be selected by the effects of an opponent's spirits, nexuses, or magic of the colors specified in its conditions.
11-5-2
【Armor】 appears on cards as 【Armor: condition 1, condition 2, condition 3, ...】.
11-6.
【Luster】
11-6-1
【Luster】 is a triggered effect. When a spirit possessing 【Luster】 attacks, all of the magic cards used by its owner during that battle are returned from the trash to their hand at the end of the battle.
11-6-2
Cards which would normally be returned to the hand by 【Luster】 do not return if they ended up in some other area prior to returning to the hand.
11-7.
【Blessed】
11-7-1
【Blessed】is a triggered effect which places one core from the void into its controller's life when activated. 【Blessed】 is triggered when a spirit possessing it attacks and reduces the opponent's life after applying damage.
11-8.
【Ascend】
11-8-1
When summoning a card with【Ascend】, in addition to paying the normal cost, you must place all the cores from a spirit fulfilling the specified condition into the reserve.
11-8-2
【Ascend】appears on cards as 【Ascend: condition】.
12.
Miscellaneous Rules
12-1.
Infinite Loops
12-1-1
During a game, there may be an action that can be performed an infinite number of times or a situation where a player is required to repeat an action an infinite number of times. This is called an infinite loop, and the period between where the action starts and where it first begins to repeat is called the looping action. When an infinite loop occurs, follow the steps below.
12-1-1-1
If neither player is able to end the infinite loop, the game ends in a draw.
12-1-1-2
If one player is given a choice to end the infinite loop, that player declares how many times they wish to perform the looping action. The looping action is performed that number of times, then ended with an action that can end the infinite loop. If the game state afterwards is identical to the state at the start of the infinite loop (all the same cards are in the same areas), reentering the infinite loop is no longer considered an option unless it is forced by a triggered effect or something similar.
12-1-1-3
If both players are given a choice to end the infinite loop, the player taking their turn declares the number of times they wish to perform the looping action, then their opponent declares the number of times they wish to perform the looping action. Following both declarations, the looping action is performed the lowest number of times declared, then ended, by the player who declared the lower number, with an action that can end the infinite loop. If the game state afterwards is identical to the state at the start of the infinite loop (all the same cards are in the same areas), reentering the infinite loop is no longer considered an option for the player who declared the larger number unless it is forced by a triggered effect or something similar.
12-2.
Revealing Cards
12-2-1
When moving a card which fulfills a necessary condition from one private area to another private area—for example, when an effect requires you to "view the top four cards of your deck. Reveal one magic card from the cards you viewed and add it to your hand"—that card must be revealed, even when there are no instructions to do so.
12-2-2
When a cost or card effect reveals a card in a private area, the revealed card becomes private again after the cost or card effect is resolved.
12-3.
Viewing Private Areas
12-3-1
Occasionally a card effect will require cards in private areas to be viewed. Unless specified otherwise, only the controller of that card effect can view those cards.
12-3-2
Cards never leave the area they are in during the act of viewing them.
12-3-3
Unless the text of an effect specifies some other action, cards in private areas are returned after being viewed and all of the cards in that area must then be reordered randomly by shuffling or some similar method.
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